Our Appetite for Risk


First there was the question of television coverage – for us back on Earth and for mission control. Planting a fixed video camera on the Moon's surface was one of Armstrong's first tasks and Nasa was very clear that thereafter everything he and Aldrin did had to be within its range of view, which wasn't large. They wanted to be able to see, for instance, how well they were walking in those clunky outfits.

Here we learn, however, that even Armstrong himself was unable entirely to play by the rules. "I candidly admit that I knowingly and deliberately left the planned working area out of TV coverage to examine and photograph the interior crater walls for possible bedrock exposure or other useful information," he acknowledged. "I felt the potential gain was worth the risk."

...and contrast:

It is becoming clear that the Great Recession has left a deep and possibly lasting scar on the American psyche. From CEOs to ordinary families, we are a nation that is more cautious, more fearful and more risk-averse. This widespread and -- so far -- indestructible anxiety has hobbled the recovery and helps explain the slow pace of job creation. The economy's revival depends in part on risk-taking, but risk-taking is in eclipse.

There is a wall of worry, whose cause transcends the recession's severity. We now fear not only what we know but also what we don't.